Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Workstation
and Windows NT 4.0 Server Service Pack 6 (README.HTM)


How to Use This Document

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction
1.1 What Is Service Pack 6?
1.2 List of Fixes in Service Pack 6
1.3 List of Fixes in Windows NT 4.0 Service Packs 1 through 5
1.4 Year 2000 Updates
1.5 Encryption
1.5.1 Encryption in this Service Pack
1.5.2 How to Get the Correct Version
1.6 How to Order the Service Pack 6 CD
1.6.1 What is on the Service Pack 6 CD

2.0 Installation Instructions for Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 6
2.1 Downloading and Extracting the Service Pack
2.2 Before You Install the Service Pack
2.2.1 Advanced Power Management
2.2.2 Power Management Utilities
2.2.3 3Com EtherLink 905B NIC Driver
2.3 Service Pack Install Order Documentation
2.4 Installing the Service Pack
2.4.1 Running Update.exe in Unattended Setup Mode (-u)
2.5 Service Pack Uninstall
2.6 Installing Symbol Files from the CD
2.7 Installing Windows NT 4.0 on a Computer Running Windows 2000
2.8 Upgrading a Cluster to Service Pack 6
2.8.1 Rolling Upgrade
2.8.2 Alternatives to a Rolling Upgrade

3.0 User Notes
3.1 Emergency Repair Disk
3.2 Adding New Components
3.3 Internet Information Server 4.0, Secure Sockets Layer and Root Certifying Authority Certificates, and the IISCA.exe Tool
3.4 Message Queue (MSMQ) Issues and Fixes
3.4.1 Message Queue Notes
3.4.2 MSMQ Protected Storage Service
3.4.3 Disabling the Nagling Option
3.4.4 Receiving Messages using MSMQ COM API
3.4.5 Backing up and Restoring MSMQ Messages
3.4.6 Using DIRECT Format Name for Reading from a Remote Queue
3.4.7 Using the MSMQ MQIS Update/Restore Wizard
3.5 Obtaining Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC)
3.6 Compaq Support Guidelines for Alpha-Based Systems

4.0 Additional Fixes and Workarounds
4.1 Dual-Booting Between Versions of Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000
4.2 NTFS for Windows NT 4.0 Version 4 and NTFS for Windows 2000 Support
4.3 Internet Information Server 4.0
4.3.1 Username/Password Length
4.3.2 Using Global.asa
4.4 Security Configuration Manager
4.4.1 Error Messages Received When You Log On to a Secure Desktop
4.5 Microsoft Proxy Server
4.5.1 Web Administration Tool
4.5.2 Microsoft Proxy Server 1.0 Client
4.6 MDAC 2.0 Service Pack 1
4.7 Installing Internet Explorer 5 as a Non-Default Browser
4.8 Exchange Server Reindexing
4.9 Regset.exe and Tandqic.sys Backup Issues

5.0 Application Notes
5.1 CheckIt Diagnostic Kit 4.0 by Touchstone
5.2 Terminal Server
5.3 Message Queue (MSMQ) for Windows 95 Client
5.4 Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack Fixes
5.5 Security Configuration Manager
5.6 Certificate Server 1.0 Known Problems and Limitations
5.7 Enabling Activity Accessibility Support

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Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change without notice and is provided for informational purposes only. The entire risk of the use or results of the use of this document remains with the user, and Microsoft Corporation makes no warranties, either express or implied. The example companies, organizations, products, people, and events depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, person, or event is intended or should be inferred. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in, or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

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© 1999 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, Windows NT, and NetMeeting are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S.A. and/or other countries.

The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

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How to Use This Document

This document provides information about Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Workstation and Windows NT 4.0 Server Service Pack 6 (SP6), as well as answers to questions that you might have.

For the most up-to-date list of supported hardware, see the Hardware Compatibility List by visiting the Microsoft Web site at:
http://www.microsoft.com/hcl/default.asp

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1.0 Introduction

This release of Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 6 is easy to apply while Windows NT is running. SP6 updates all files that are older than those included in this Windows NT Service Pack. Service Pack releases are cumulative, containing all previous Service Pack fixes and any new fixes created after Service Pack 5 (SP5).

Important: You should stop running any critical services before you apply Windows NT 4.0 SP6. For more preinstallation recommendations, see Before You Install the Service Pack, later in this document.

1.1 What Is Service Pack 6?

SP6 is a collection of current updates and enhancements to Windows NT Server 4.0 and Windows NT Workstation 4.0 since their releases.

SP6 is not a required upgrade. If you have deployed or are in the process of deploying a previous Service Pack, you probably need not change your plans. To accommodate customers in this situation, Microsoft provides software updates for critical issues to previous Service Packs. For example, you can continue to obtain year 2000 (Y2K) software updates if you're using Service Pack 4 (SP4).

SP6 content is focused on:

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1.2 List of Fixes in Service Pack 6

To assist customers who are deciding whether to upgrade to SP6, Microsoft provides extensive documentation of the fixes and updates contained in SP6. This documentation gives customers the opportunity to analyze whether the SP6 contents justify the necessary test and deployment resources. For the most recent list of affected Service Pack files, visit the Microsoft Windows NT Server Web site at:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/servicepacks

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1.3 List of Fixes in Windows NT 4.0 Service Packs 1 through 5

For a list of fixes contained in Service Packs 1 through 5, visit the Microsoft Personal Online Support Center Web site at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/

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1.4 Year 2000 Updates

SP6 is not required for year 2000 compliance. Microsoft is committed to maintaining SP4, SP5, and SP6 with fixes for known year 2000 issues.

Note: In order to simplify the upgrade process, the SP4 Y2ksetup.exe composite patch is no longer included in the recommended upgrade path. Y2ksetup.exe was used to update the following Windows NT 4.0 components:

Important: Do not install Y2ksetup.exe after you install SP6.

With SP6, you should install any needed updates to these components individually.

The Microsoft Year 2000 Product Analyzer scans a hard disk or network drive to report the year 2000 compliance levels of Microsoft products and, if updates are required, the report provides links to product-specific update information.

To determine which updates you may need, to download the Microsoft Year 2000 Product Analyzer, or to read the latest year 2000 information regarding Microsoft products, visit the Microsoft Year 2000 Portal Page Web site at:
http://www.microsoft.com/year2000/
You can also call the Microsoft Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure line at 1-888-MSFT-Y2K (1-888-673-8925) or contact your local Microsoft subsidiary.

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1.5 Encryption

This section contains important information regarding standard and 128-bit encryption.

1.5.1 Encryption in this Service Pack

SP6 contains standard encryption. This release isn't supported for installation on an existing North American 128-bit installation of Windows NT 4.0. If you install SP6 on a computer with 128-bit encryption, system services might fail to start.

To determine if 128-bit encryption is installed
  1. Double-click My Computer.
  2. On the View menu, click Folder Options.
  3. On the View tab, select Show all files, and then click OK.
  4. Click Start, point to Find, and then click Files or Folders.
  5. In Named, type Rsaenh.dll.
  6. Select the hard disk to search, and then click Find Now.
  7. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for any additional hard disks you want to check.

If the file exists in the system folder in your Windows NT folder, then you have 128-bit encryption support installed. If the file does not exist, you have standard encryption.

Installing the standard encryption version of SP6 on a previously existing 128-bit computer does not downgrade all of the encryption in the operating computer, so it will not necessarily change whether you can export the computer.

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1.5.2 How to Get the Correct Version

If your computer has 128-bit encryption, download the 128-bit version of SP6. To do this, visit the Microsoft Windows NT Server Web site at:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/servicepacks

The 128-bit CD can be ordered from the same Web site.

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1.6 How to Order the Service Pack 6 CD

The Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack CD contains supplemental and support files that you may find useful. To order the CD, visit the Microsoft Windows NT Server Web site at:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/servicepacks

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1.6.1 What is on the Service Pack 6 CD

The \Support and \ValueAdd folders on this CD contain additional Windows components that can be installed as you need them. These files are not part of the Service Pack 6 installation, but are included for installation and use at your discretion. They include:

This CD also contain files in the \Alpha and \i386 folders that are not installed automatically. They are also not in the downloaded version of SP6. The files are used to install:

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2.0 Installation Instructions for Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 6

Carefully read the installation instructions before you install Service Pack 6, since they may have changed from previous Service Packs.

2.1 Downloading and Extracting the Service Pack

If you have downloaded this Service Pack from an FTP site or a Web site, you should read the release notes completely before you extract and install the Service Pack. For this release, these self-extracting program files are also located at the root of the CD. They are SP6alpha.exe for Alpha-based computers and SP6i386.exe for Intel-based computers.

Downloading the Service Pack saves a compressed program file on your hard disk. To extract this file and begin the installation process, for example, at the command prompt, type: SP6i386.exe or double-click the file in My Computer. You can also extract the file into the current folder without launching the installation program by using the command prompt switch /x. For example, at the command prompt, type: SP6i386 /x

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2.2 Before You Install the Service Pack

Close all active debugging sessions before installing this Service Pack. Otherwise, the Update program is unable to replace system files that are in use. If a file is in use when you install SP6, a dialog box appears prompting you to cancel the installation or skip the file copy. You should cancel the installation and then uninstall SP6. To uninstall SP6, see Service Pack Uninstall, later in this document.

Also, to maximize recovery of the computer in the event of installation failure, you should do the following before installing SP6:

To enable the uninstall option, run Update.exe. A subfolder named Uninstall is created in your Windows NT folder. This requires at least 120 megabytes (MB) of free space on the disk on which Windows NT 4.0 is installed, 60 MB for the uninstall folder, and 60 MB for the Service Pack-updated system files.

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2.2.1 Advanced Power Management

Advanced Power Management is not supported by Windows NT 4.0. As a result, you should remove Advanced Power Management features before installing SP6.

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2.2.2 Power Management Utilities

Power Management Utilities may not work on Windows NT 4.0 SP6. Contact the vendor of your Power Management Utilities for an updated version that is compatible with Windows NT 4.0 SP6.

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2.2.3 3Com EtherLink 905B NIC Driver

There is a known issue with the 3Com EtherLink 905B network adapter driver prior to version 3.38.40.0. If an earlier version of the driver is detected during SP6 installation, it will be replaced with version 3.40.40.0. If you have an EtherLink 905B network adapter and need to reinstall the drivers, you can obtain the latest drivers from 3Comís Web site at:
http://www.3com.com

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2.3 Service Pack Install Order Documentation

Important: If you are installing Service Packs for multiple Microsoft products, the order in which you install the Service Packs may have an effect on stability. To view the documentation about the recommended installation order, visit the Microsoft Windows NT Server Web site at:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/servicepacks

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2.4 Installing the Service Pack

To install SP6 from the CD

  1. Insert the Service Pack CD into your CD-ROM drive.
  2. If a Web page opens in your browser after you insert the CD, click Install Service Pack 6, and then click Install Service Pack 6 for Intel-based systems or Install Service Pack 6 for Alpha-based systems (depending upon whether you have an Intel-based or an Alpha-based computer).
  3. When prompted to download Update.exe or to save it to disk, click Run this program from its current location, and then click OK. Follow the instructions that appear.
    Note: To use the uninstall feature of SP6, during the initial installation, you must select the Backup files necessary to uninstall this Service Pack check box.
  4. If a Web page doesn't automatically open when you insert the CD, open the command prompt window, and change the folder to the drive letter associated with the CD-ROM drive.
  5. To open the command prompt

    • Click Start, point to Programs, and then click Command Prompt.
  6. Change the folder by typing systemroot\i386\Update or \Alpha\Update (depending upon whether you have an Intel-based or an Alpha-based computer), and then type update.
  7. Follow the instructions that appear.

To install SP6 from a network drive

  1. Connect to the network drive that has the SP6 files.
  2. Change the drive letter to that of the network drive.
  3. Change the folder to \i386\Update or \Alpha\Update (depending upon whether you have an Intel-based or an Alpha-based computer), and then type update.
  4. Follow the instructions that appear.

Note: You should allow Setup to create an Uninstall folder the first time you install SP6.

To enable the uninstall option, run Update.exe. A subfolder named Uninstall is created in your Windows NT folder. This requires at least 120 megabytes (MB) of free space on the disk on which Windows NT 4.0 is installed, 60 MB for the uninstall folder, and 60 MB for the Service Pack-updated system files.

To install SP6 from the Internet

  1. Using your browser, visit the Microsoft Windows NT Server Web site at:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/servicepacks
  2. Click Install Service Pack 6 to install SP6 on your computer.

This Web page automatically detects which files need to be updated and then copies the appropriate files to a temporary folder on your computer. It then installs only those files that are needed to update your computer.

Note: If you use a Web browser other than Internet Explorer 3.02 or later, you may be unable to install SP6 by using this update method. You can still install SP6 by downloading the entire Service Pack from the Internet onto your computer and running Update.exe locally.

You can use installation switches with Update.exe. The following syntax help is available by typing update /?: at the command prompt.

UPDATE [-u] [-f] [-n] [-o] [-z] [-q]

-u Unattended Setup mode
-f Force other programs to close at shutdown
-n Do not back up files for uninstall
-o Overwrite OEM files without prompting
-z Do not restart when installation is complete
-q Quiet mode - no user interaction

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2.4.1 Running Update.exe in Unattended Setup Mode (-u)

To run Update.exe in unattended Setup mode by using the -u flag, you must also use the -o flag to ensure that OEM-supplied files are updated. If you don't use the -o flag, files such as the hardware abstraction layer (HAL) and disk miniport drivers are not updated.

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2.5 Service Pack Uninstall

This Service Pack contains an uninstall feature that you can use to restore your computer to its previous state.

To enable the uninstall option, run Update.exe. A subfolder named Uninstall is created in your Windows NT folder. This requires at least 120 megabytes (MB) of free space on the disk on which Windows NT 4.0 is installed, 60 MB for the uninstall folder, and 60 MB for the Service Pack-updated system files.

To uninstall SP6 using Add/Remove Programs

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs, click Windows NT 4.0 SP6, and then click Add/Remove.
  3. Follow the instructions that appear.

To uninstall SP6 from the command prompt

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, and then click Command Prompt.
  2. Change the folder to \%systemroot%\$NtServicePackUninstall$\spuninst\ and then type: Spuninst.exe
  3. Type Exit to close the Command Prompt window.

Note: If you install any programs or services that require SP6 or have fixes contained in SP6, uninstalling SP6 could adversely affect those programs.

To uninstall SP6, the drive letter for the hard disk must be the same one used when you installed SP6. If you change the drive letter for the hard disk, you cannot uninstall SP6.

To uninstall Service Pack 2 (SP2) and Service Pack 3 (SP3), you had to run Update.exe and then select Uninstall a previously installed Service Pack. These commands returned your computer to its previous state. After your computer restarted, the Update.exe program replaced the files updated by the Service Pack with most of the files from the previous installation and returned most of your registry settings to what they were before the Service Pack was installed.

Note: If you uninstall SP6 on a computer that previously had SP3 (without Internet Explorer 4.0) installed on it, cryptography will not work correctly after the uninstall completes. To work around this issue, reinstall SP3 after you have uninstalled SP6.

Uninstalling SP6 will not uninstall new versions of CryptoAPI and SChannel.

Important: If you plan to install a previous Service Pack after uninstalling SP6, note that SP6 modifies the Security Account Manager (SAM) database and the Security database so that older versions of the Samsrv.dll, Samlib.dll, Lsasrv.dll, Services.exe, Msv1_0.dll, and Winlogon.exe files no longer recognize the database structure. Therefore, the uninstall process doesn't restore these files when uninstalling SP6. If you install a prior Service Pack (for example, SP3) after uninstalling SP6, when the Confirm File Replace dialog boxes appear, click No to avoid overwriting Samsrv.dll and Winlogon.exe. If you overwrite the newer files with these older versions, you'll be unable to log on to the computer.

Note: If you're reinstalling SP6 after installing new software or hardware, you must create a new Uninstall folder. To retain your ability to return to a startup configuration , copy the current Uninstall folder to a safe location before running the SP6 installation program.

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2.6 Installing Symbol Files from the CD

Each program file in Windows NT 4.0 has a corresponding symbol file that is helpful in diagnosing application and computer problems. Symbol files are used in conjunction with a debugger and are not required for proper operation of your computer.

The symbols for SP6 files are compressed in self-extracting program files named SP6symi.exe for Intel-based computers and SP6syma.exe for Alpha-based computers. To install the symbol files corresponding to the new binaries in SP6, run the executable file. When prompted, specify the path to the location of the previous version's symbols, such as C:\Winnt\. In this example, the symbols are stored in C:\Winnt\symbols.

For more information about debugging in Windows NT 4.0, see Chapter 39, "Windows NT Debugger" in the Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Workstation Resource Kit.

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2.7 Installing Windows NT 4.0 on a Computer Running Windows 2000

When installing Windows NT 4.0 on a computer with Windows 2000 beta version or later installed, Setup may continuously restart after the initial text-mode phase of Windows NT 4.0 Setup.

The updated Winnt32.exe in the \Support\Winnt32 folder allows you to install Windows NT 4.0 on a computer already running Windows 2000.

To update the Winnt32.exe

  1. Copy the \Support\Winnt32\Winnt32.exe file from the Windows NT 4.0 SP6 CD to a folder on your hard disk. You can also double-click the file on the SP6 CD.
  2. When prompted for the location of the Windows NT 4.0 files, supply the path to the \i386 folder or \Alpha on the Windows NT 4.0 CD.
  3. After Windows NT 4.0 is installed, install SP6.
  4. Copy Ntldr.com and Ntdetect.com from the Windows 2000 CD to the root of the system drive.

Note: To use this installation method, your installation partition must be formatted with the FAT file system.

For more information, visit the Microsoft Personal Online Support Center Web site at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/

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2.8 Upgrading a Cluster to Service Pack 6

This section covers upgrading your cluster services to Service Pack 6.

2.8.1 Rolling Upgrade

You can eliminate the downtime of your cluster services and minimize administrative complexity by performing a rolling upgrade of the operating system. In a rolling upgrade, you sequentially upgrade the operating system on each node, making sure that one node is always available to handle client requests.

A rolling upgrade consists of four phases:

The operation of Phase 3, when the two cluster nodes run different Service Packs, is called a "mixed-version cluster." You should ensure that every resource on your cluster can operate in a mixed-version environment. If version incompatibilities prevent a cluster resource from operating in a mixed-version cluster, you won't be able to successfully complete your rolling upgrade.

Note: You can't create new groups, resources, or resource types in a mixed-version cluster.

To perform a rolling upgrade

  1. Pause the cluster service on Node 1 and move its resource groups to Node 2.
  2. Upgrade Node 1 from SP3 to SP6.
  3. Perform validation tests on Node 1 to certify that the node is fully functional.
  4. In Cluster Administrator, click Resume Node.
  5. Repeat Steps 1 through 4 for Node 2 instead of Node 1.

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2.8.2 Alternatives to a Rolling Upgrade

There are two alternatives to a rolling upgrade for upgrading Windows NT 4.0 on a cluster.

If you can't perform a rolling upgrade because your cluster manages a resource that is incompatible with rolling upgrades, consider taking the incompatible resource offline, performing a rolling upgrade, and then installing the new version of the resource.

If most of your cluster resources are incompatible with a rolling upgrade, you should consider performing a clean install of Microsoft Cluster Server. If you do this, you must reconfigure your cluster after the installation.

To perform a clean install of Microsoft Cluster Server

  1. In Cluster Administrator, stop the cluster service on Node 1. On Node 1, uninstall Microsoft Cluster Server.
  2. Stop the Cluster Service on Node 2. On Node 2, uninstall Cluster Server. At this point, the cluster that was running on Node 1 and Node 2 no longer exists.
  3. Reinstall Cluster Server on Node 1 using the Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition Components CD, and then form a new cluster using the name of the original cluster.
  4. Reinstall SP6 and perform validation tests on Node 1. SP6 upgrades the original SP3 clustering product to SP6.
  5. Reinstall the Cluster Server on Node 2 using the Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition Components CD, and then join the newly formed cluster.
  6. Reinstall Cluster Server, and then perform validation tests on Node 2.
  7. Using Cluster Administrator, add cluster resources to your new cluster.

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3.0 User Notes

This section covers information that is specific to Service Pack 6.

3.1 Emergency Repair Disk

If you use the Windows NT 4.0 Emergency Repair Disk to repair your Windows NT 4.0 computer, Windows NT 4.0 requires that you supply the original Windows NT 4.0 media at some time after you install SP6. This means you need to reinstall SP6 after the repair is completed because the Emergency Repair Disk repairs your computer by restoring your original Windows NT 4.0 system files. After the repair is complete, to reinstall SP6, follow the Installation Instructions in Section 2.0. For more information about using the Windows NT 4.0 Emergency Repair Disk utility, visit the Microsoft Personal Online Support Center Web site at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/

Note: To use the Emergency Repair Disk utility, you must have the updated version of Setupdd.sys that comes with SP6. To update your version of Setupdd.sys, copy Setupdd.sys from the Service Pack to your Windows NT 4.0 Setup Disk 2 from the original product media. This replaces the earlier version of Setupdd.sys with the updated version. For more information, see the Microsoft Personal Online Support Center Web site at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/

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3.2 Adding New Components

If you change or add new software or hardware components to your computer after you install SP6, you'll need to install SP6 again. This is because the files included on the original Windows NT 4.0 media may not be the same as the files on the Service Pack CD. You can't install new components, such as a new keyboard or printer driver, directly from the Service Pack media. You must install new components from the original product media and then reinstall the Service Pack.

For example, if you install the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) service after installing SP6, you'll need to reinstall the Service Pack. Otherwise, you'll receive the message "Entrypoint SnmpSvcGetEnterpriseOID could not be located in Snmpapi.dll." This informs you that some of the files in the SNMP service have been updated in SP6 and that you have a version mismatch. Reinstalling SP6 fixes the problem by copying the newer versions of the files onto your computer.

Note: SNMP security provides the ability to set a permission level on the SNMP agent computer. The permission level determines how the SNMP agent computer processes requests from an SNMP community.

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3.3 Internet Information Server 4.0, Secure Sockets Layer and Root Certifying Authority Certificates, and the IISCA.exe Tool

If you use Internet Information Server 4.0 (IIS) with Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and you have installed a root certifying authority certificate (other than those issued by well-known third parties, such as Verisign, Thawte Consulting, or Microsoft), you may need to reinstall the affected root certifying authority certificates after you install SP6. You need to do this if you're using Microsoft Certificate Server 1.0, which shipped with the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack.

To reinstall the root certifying authority certificate

  1. Start Internet Explorer 5.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options.
  3. On the Content tab, click Certificates.
  4. Click Import to start the Certificate Manager Import Wizard and follow the instructions that appear.

Note: You no longer need to use the IISCA.exe tool.

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3.4 Message Queue Notes

The following sections cover issues and fixes for the MSMQ service.

3.4.1 Message Queue Notes

A new MSMQ registry entry helps you configure the MSMQ Service to prevent contacting the MSMQ Information Store (MQIS) at startup, such as by not starting auto-dialing.

Important: Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer.

To activate the MSMQ Service

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. Type regedt32, and then click OK.
  3. In the Registry Editor, open HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\MSMQ\Parameters.
  4. On the Edit menu, click Add Key.
  5. In Key Name, type DeferredInit.
  6. In Class, type DWORD with a value of 0x1.
  7. Click OK.
  8. Close the Registry Editor.

Add this only if the initial MQIS access causes unwanted dial-up because this setting can delay programs calling MQOpenQueue in offline situations.

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3.4.2 MSMQ Protected Storage Service

Protected Storage Service (PSS) must be started before starting MSMQ. Some services, such as SQL 7.0, can cause a delay in PSS starting up, which results in MSMQ failing to start due to timing out. Applying SP6 prevents this problem automatically by making MSMQ dependent on PSS.

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3.4.3 Disabling the Nagling option

By default, MSMQ uses TCP sockets with Nagling enabled. The sending machine might wait before sending a small packet to see if another packet is sent which can be merged. In applications where the delay is undesirable or unacceptable, the Nagling option can be disabled in the registry.

Important: Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer.

To disable Nagling in the registry

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. Type regedt32, and then click OK.
  3. In Registry Editor, open HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\MSMQ\Parameters.
  4. Double-click TcpNoDelay to open Dword Editor.
  5. In Data, type 1 and then click OK.
  6. Close the Registry Editor.

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3.4.4 Receiving Messages Using MSMQ COM API

You can now receive messages using MSMQ COM API with a sender certificate larger than 4096 bytes and with a sender ID larger than 32 bytes. The maximum sender ID is now 128 bytes.

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3.4.5 Backing Up and Restoring MSMQ Messages

Messages held by MSMQ service can be backed up and restored on a specific computer along with MSMQ registry settings. To perform this task, download the utility available from:
ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/bussys/distapps/Msmq/Public-Fixes/1.0/mqbkup/

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3.4.6 Using DIRECT Format Name for Reading from a Remote Queue

Applications using MSMQ can address queues in three different ways using format names. Using DIRECT format name for reading from a remote queue failed in earlier versions of Windows NT 4.0. This problem is fixed in SP6.

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3.4.7 Using the MSMQ MQIS Update/Restore Wizard

If you are using SQL 6.5, you can use the MSMQ MQIS Update/Restore Wizard to restore or to update the MSMQ 1.0 MQIS database. The wizard is located in \Support\Msmq.nt on the SP6 CD.

To update or restore the MQIS database using SQL 7.0, download the newer version of this wizard by visiting: ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/bussys/distapps/Msmq/Public-Fixes/1.0/mqis-restore

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3.5 Obtaining Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC)

To download the latest version of MDAC, visit the Microsoft Universal Data Access Web site at: http://www.microsoft.com/data/default.htm

To obtain information on MDAC year 2000 compliance, visit the Microsoft Year 2000 Resource Center Web site at: http://www.microsoft.com/year2000

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3.6 Compaq Support Guidelines for Alpha-Based Systems

Compaq has made the decision to move forward with SP6 support on specific Alpha-based systems. A list of systems that will be supported on SP6 is available at Compaqís Web site at:
http://www.compaq.com/support/files/alphant

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4.0 Additional Fixes and Workarounds

This section contains additional fixes and workarounds for SP6.

4.1 Dual-Booting Between Versions of Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000

If you dual-boot your computer to run both Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000, each installation or instance of Windows must have a unique computer name.

Note: These unique names are required only if the dual-boot computer is on the same Windows domain.

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4.2 NTFS for Windows NT 4.0 Version 4 and NTFS for Windows 2000 Support

There are two recent versions of Windows NT File System (NTFS):

This Service Pack contains an updated version of NTFS.sys that can also read NTFS Version 5 volumes created in NTFS for Windows 2000.

Note: The following scenarios don't support dual-booting:

You cannot gain access to the following features of Windows 2000-supported NTFS from SP6, even with the updated NTFS.sys:

Attempts by Windows NT 4.0 SP6 users or programs to gain access to release points created on NTFS for Windows 2000 drives with a Windows 2000 installation fail, usually with an "access denied" message.

Antivirus programs may report to the user (by log file, dialog box, or both) when a file can't be accessed. These programs may report their failure to access NSS files with extensions that the programs are set to scan. Archiving programs can't add NSS files to an archive, and the archiving might be reported as an error. Backup programs won't back up NSS files or release points as expected. The programs may log the failures as either "file in use" or "file not available." Some backup programs fail when they try to verify folders that contain NSS files during the backup process.

When you mount a Windows 2000-supported NTFS volume under Windows NT 4.0 SP6, NTFS for Windows 2000 features are unavailable, and Chkdsk can't be performed against the volume. However, most read/write operations function normally if they don't make use of any NTFS for Windows 2000 features. Also, since files can be read and written on Windows 2000-supported volumes under Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000 may need to perform "clean-up" operations by running Chkdsk on the volume after it's mounted on Windows NT 4.0. These clean-up operations ensure that the NTFS for Windows 2000 data structures are consistent after a Windows NT 4.0 mount operation.

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4.3 Internet Information Server 4.0

4.3.1 Username/Password Length

The length limitation for Username/Password combinations when you use Internet Information Server 4.0 has been fixed in SP6. This length limitation previously caused errors during basic authentication on IIS 4.0.

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4.3.2 Using Global.asa

To use the Global.asa file after applying SP6, ensure that the file is in a program root folder. This is a change from the implementation in the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack in which Global.asa was mistakenly processed from within a virtual directory.

The Global.asa file specifies event scripts and declares objects that have session or program scope. In the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, the file Asp.dll processed Global.asa from the lowest defined virtual directory. This has been changed in SP6. After SP6 is installed, customers who are using Global.asa may need to make changes to IIS for the file to work properly. For more information, see the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack Help.

To ensure that Global.asa is available to Asp.dll after applying SP6, folders that contain Global.asa files should be marked as applications. For more information, see the "Creating Applications" topic in the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack online documentation.

Certain CryptoAPI-related file name extensions (.cer, .crt, and .der) aren't registered correctly when Internet Explorer 4 is installed after SP6. To restore the file name extension registration, run the following command line:

Regsvr32.exe cryptext.dll

This problem is fixed in Internet Explorer 5.

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4.4 Security Configuration Manager

This section discusses issues with Security Configuration Manager.

4.4.1 Error Messages Received When You Log On to a Secure Desktop

The first time a user logs on to a Compatible, Secure, or Hi Secure Windows NT 4.0 computer running Internet Explorer 5 or later, the following message appears:

"INF Install Failure. Reason: Access is denied. Corresponding Start Menu Items are missing."

To work around this message, potential users of the system should log on prior to securing the desktop.

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4.5 Microsoft Proxy Server

This section discusses issues using Microsoft Proxy Server with Windows NT 4.0 SP6.

4.5.1 Web Administration Tool

After SP6 is installed, the Web Administration Tool for Microsoft Proxy Server 2.0 may stop responding. This occurs because IIS doesnít have the correct program setting for the Proxy Server Web administration tool, which requires script execute permission. This problem may only occur with Windows NT Server 4.0, SP6, and the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack.

To restart the Web Administration Tool

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Microsoft Internet Server, and then click Internet Service Manager.
  2. In the left pane, click Internet Information Server.
  3. In the right pane, double-click your server name.
  4. In the right pane, double-click MS Proxy Administration Web Site.
  5. In the right pane, right-click PrxAdmin, and then click Properties.
  6. On the Virtual Directory tab, and then in the Application Settings section, set the Permissions to Script.
  7. In the Application Settings section, click Create.

  8. If a Remove button appears and there isnít a Create button, no further action is necessary. The computer is already properly configured.
  9. Click OK. You may be prompted to restart your computer.

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4.5.2 Microsoft Proxy Server 1.0 Client


Installing SP6 on a computer running Windows NT 4.0 Workstation or Server with Microsoft Proxy Server 1.0 client installed disables the WinSock Proxy Client component. As a result, programs that access the Internet and depend on the Proxy client may not be able to gain access to the Internet. You should uninstall Microsoft Proxy Client before installing SP6. After you install SP6, you can reinstall the Proxy Client.

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4.6 MDAC 2.0 Service Pack 1

If you install MDAC 2.0 or later after installing SP6, the ODBC Help files Obdcinst.hlp and Obdcinst.cnt will not match the help file for the installed version of MDAC. This is because the ODBC Help file installed by SP6 has the SP6 file date. To work around this, before you install MDAC, delete the files Odbcinst.hlp and Odbcinst.cnt. If you've already installed MDAC, delete the Odbcinst.hlp and reinstall MDAC.

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4.7 Installing Internet Explorer 5 as a Non-Default Browser

You can install Internet Explorer 5 without adding the Internet Explorer icon to the desktop and without adding the system file associations that make Internet Explorer 5 the default browser. If you have the SP6 CD, you can find Internet Explorer 5 in the \ValueAdd\MSIE5 folder.

To install Internet Explorer 5 as a non-default browser

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. In Named, type:
    IE5SETUP.EXE /C:"ie5wzd /S:""#e"" /X /R:N /Q:A /m:0"
  3. Click OK.

This command changes the Internet Explorer 5 installation to prevent adding the Internet Explorer icon to the desktop or changing the system file associations to make Internet Explorer 5 the default browser.

Note: This command only works if you have not installed the Microsoft Windows Desktop Update on your computer.

For more information, visit the Microsoft Personal Online Support Center Web site at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/

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4.8 Exchange Server Reindexing

If you install SP6 on a computer running Microsoft Exchange Server, the installation may trigger Exchange to begin a lengthy reindexing process. While the Sort Order for Windows NT 4.0 has not changed in this Service Pack, Exchange may still interpret the application of the Service Pack as a possible Sort Order change and reindex to ensure data integrity. After reindexing is completed, the database should start. Do not attempt to interrupt the server while it is reindexing because that may cause the database to become inconsistent. For more information, visit the Microsoft Personal Online Support Center Web site at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/

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4.9 Regset.exe and Tandqic.sys Backup Issues

SP6 provides the regset.exe utility for you to work around a backup and restore issue related to tandqic.sys. Regset.exe can be used to update the default value for the following registry entries:

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Ntbackup\Backup Engine\Use fast file restore
HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Ntbackup\User Interface\Use Tape Catalogs

If you have backed up your Windows NT 4.0 SP4 or SP5 systems using tandqic.sys, you cannot restore the backup data if the above registry values are set to 1. Changing the registry values to 0 allows you to perform a successful restore.

In addition, to do a backup restoration, you must be running Ntbackup on Windows NT 4.0 with SP6 installed.

To change registry values

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, and then click Command Prompt.
  2. At the prompt, type copy d:\support\utils\regset.exe
  3. At the next prompt, type regset or regset 0 to change the default value to 0.

Note: After data backup restoration from SP4 is completed, the registry entries should be changed back to the default value of 1. If the value is not changed back, system performance will be greatly affected. To change the value manually, follow the above procedure and, at Step 3, type regset 1.

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5.0 Application Notes

This section includes program notes for SP6.

5.1 CheckIt Diagnostic Kit 4.0 by Touchstone

The CheckIt Diagnostic Kit version 4.0 won't have full functionality when you install it onto any version of Windows NT 4.0.

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5.2 Terminal Server

SP6 is not supported on Windows NT Terminal Server. A future revision of SP6 specifically for Terminal Server will include the information required to allow existing installed programs to run in a multiple-session environment. Obtain this revision in the future to install SP6 on a Windows NT Terminal Server.

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5.3 Message Queue (MSMQ) for Windows 95 Client

This SP6 CD also includes MSMQ Windows 95 Client fixes, located in the \Support\Msmq.95 folder. Most problems that are mentioned in Section 3.4, "Message Queue Notes," also apply to Windows 95. In addition, the Windows 95 MSMQ update fixes a problem causing long delays with MQOpenQueue() and MQIS operations on offline computers. This MSMQ Windows 95 update doesn't have an uninstall option.

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5.4 Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack Fixes

SP4 and SP6 include Option Pack fixes and enhancements. If you have the Internet Information Server version 4.0 Option Pack installed, the SP6 update program automatically updates the Option Pack components installed on your computer.

When you begin the installation of the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack on a server with Windows NT 4.0 SP6 and Internet Information Server 3.0, the following message may appear:

"Setup detected that Windows NT 4.0 SP4 or greater is installed on your machine. We haven't tested this product on SP4. Do you wish to proceed?"

The Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack is fully tested and supported to run on servers with the Windows NT 4.0 SP6. In the dialog box, click Yes to continue Setup.

Note: You should reinstall SP6 after you install the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack. Otherwise, an MSMQ MQIS Controller installation won't work until the SP6 is reinstalled.

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5.5 Security Configuration Manager

Security Configuration Manager (SCM) is an integrated security system that gives administrators the ability to define and apply security configurations for Windows NT 4.0 Workstation and Windows NT 4.0 Server installations. SCM also has the capability to perform inspections of the installed computers to locate any degradation in the computer's security. For further information on SCM, including installation and usage instructions, refer to Readme.txt in the \Support\Mssce folder on the SP6 CD.

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5.6 Certificate Server 1.0 Known Problems and Limitations

Release notes for Certificate Server 1.0 are on the SP6 CD. In addition, there is an update release located at:
ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/bussys/iis/iis-public/fixes/usa/certserv

The following is a list of known problems and limitations for using Certificate Server 1.0 and SP6.